34 thoughts on “I 3D-Printed a Glock to See How Far Homemade Guns Have Come – Today’s 3D-printed “ghost guns” can look, feel, and shoot like factory-made weapons.

  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Fact: An America citizen can legally make their own guns.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    I like how they make this a big deal even though CNC machines have been around for decades and can make actual metal guns

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    As always with modern day “journalism”. Clickbait title and loud accusations but if you read deeper – nothing actually new.

    You CAN’T 3D print an actual gun, only some parts that don’t suffer much stress, like receiver or handle. Main parts, that actually contain the energy can’t be 3D printed.

    Quote from the article: “Without metal parts, the Scorpion would not work. While 3D-printed plastic is strong enough to serve as the frame of the gun, it won’t hold up as a barrel or bolt.”

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Headline is misleading. They still had to use metal parts.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    “Once the rockets are up, who cares where they come down? That’s not my department, ” says [Wernher von Braun](https://youtu.be/QEJ9HrZq7Ro).

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    And yet these guns are used in next to zero crimes. Damned fear mongering.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    I own a 3D printer, work exclusively in PLA on nerd type projects (D&D miniatures, terrain etc) and have trouble imagining a functional weapon with it. The tolerances on my FDM are way to low, and the material is far from durable.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Well this only makes me want a 3D printer more.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Let me know when bullets can be 3D printed.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Lol in canada youd get the visit once you look up how to print the firing mechanism

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    You know what else makes regular factory made firearms untraceable? A nail file. It is hilarious to see people get worked up about this. Like when right wing people got worked up about transgender people using the “wrong” bathroom. It never was a real issue, nothing terrible ever happened, nobody got raped, but it sure made a good headline for a trump dumb dumb blog.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    This is great. Hopefully this technology keeps getting better

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Print guns, not money.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Anyone remember “The Liberator” back when that was controversial?

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Can’t stop the signal…

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Always wanted one of these but they’re not legal in my country so I won’t print it. But a yellow glock 19 would look so awesome lol

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    I just “attended” (I was there in case the computer no worky) the first part of an ATF training around this the other day.

    The agent brought in 3D printer and in the first hour printed a drop in sear for a Glock 17 to make it full auto.

    Some of the other items he brought were 3D printed suppressors, an AR15 lower, a P320 frame, several Glock frames and a near *completely* 3D printed Scorpion SMG. Only parts of the Scorpion that weren’t printed were the stock he bought from an airsoft dealer and the barrel assembly.

    There is even a suppressor out there that is marketed as dump truck lugnuts that you have to drill yourself and simply screw together. He said that particular kit lowered the report of a shot by 30Db.

    It’s pretty insane what is being pumped out from these machines now.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    The author refers to a magazine a “clip” in the opening sentence, immediately making me question their commitment to accurate reporting. 🤦‍♂️

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    The gun the guy made in this video barely functioned. It wasn’t until he replaced the slide with a real glock slide that he was able to reliably fire the weapon.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    This is fucking cool.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    All these guns have metal uppers lol. This article should be titled “You can 3D print the handle of a gun”. They don’t even have the liberator shooting subsonic 22 rounds. It blows my mind that people don’t realize you can build a gun with a cast iron pipe from homedepot and a rubber band, or a staple gun.

    [https://www.reddit.com/r/Prisonwallet/comments/bf8p88/prison_made_zip_gun/](https://www.reddit.com/r/Prisonwallet/comments/bf8p88/prison_made_zip_gun/)

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    “I ultimately settled on the Glock 19, as its essential parts were readilyavailable online. The barrel, slide, trigger assembly, and other metalbits cost around $320”

    https://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Crude.jpg

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    >Today’s 3D-printed “ghost guns” can look, feel, and shoot like factory-made weapons.

    The operative term is ‘can’. Just because something *can be* 3D printed doesn’t mean *you* have any chance of printing a functional version yourself without investing massive amounts of time and money.

    >Having never owned a 3D-printer or a gun, I started as a blank slate. Rob Pincus, a personal defense instructor and gun rights advocate, agreed to lend expertise and a 3D-printer.

    That’s a hell of a ‘blank slate’.

    But as easy as it is for anyone to acquire firearms in the US, I’m okay with people opting to build something that’s more likely to injure them long before they ever come around me with it. It’s not like these are going to cut into WalMart’s sales.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    You’d still need a metal barrel wouldn’t you?

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    To be fair, you’re only able to print the parts that take the least amount of stress. Like the frames and some types of retaining pins. Not whole ass guns. You MIGHT get one or two good shots out of a fully 3d printed gun before it gets too hot and becomes a potential grenade in your hands. Also, he called a 30 round magazine a clip…

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Cooooool. I 3D print professionally a number of products and this is on my wishlist of things to do… but all of my printers are always printing money.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Fuck yeah. Let freedom ring.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    > The most common and controversial ghost guns cost a few hundred dollars online and come “80 percent” finished in a box with all the necessary tools. The sudden proliferation of these cheap, mail-order ghost guns has prompted alarm among law enforcement nationwide.

    Cheap, DIY gun kits for the wackadoo in your life!

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Hell yes

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Do you know how I know this article is bullshit and the author knows nothing about guns. The very first sentance ” The fully-automatic “Scorpion” submachine gun can burn through a 30-round clip of 9mm ammo” No one who knows guns would refer to a magazine as a clip…..

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Don’t tread on me

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Attain the means of production and become ungovernable.

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  • August 26, 2021 at 6:19 pm
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    Cool, wish I owned a 3d printer. I would make some cool shit

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